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New York State Total Solar Eclipse - April 2024

New York State Total Solar Eclipse 

A solar eclipse will be visible in New York State on the afternoon of April 8, 2024.  New York will be one of eleven contiguous U.S. states situated within the path of totality for the total solar eclipse. Several regions of the state will be in the direct path of totality. Other parts will be able to view a partial solar eclipse. This presents a unique educational opportunity for students to learn about this exciting astronomical event, and an ideal teachable moment for teachers to delve into the wonders of the cosmos. The next total solar eclipse will not happen in New York again until 2079.

Potential considerations for schools

Except during the brief total phase of a total solar eclipse, when the moon completely blocks the sun's bright face, it is unsafe to look directly at the sun without specialized eye protection for solar viewing.

School districts are highly encouraged to begin planning for this event, and to keep the following in mind:

  • Schools are encouraged to review their school calendars sooner rather than later to avoid potential conflicts with other school related events and activities.
  • The eclipse will begin and occur shortly after 2:00 pm, which may overlap with school dismissal.
  • This event is not considered an emergency. Schools and districts may not opt to switch to remote learning and count that towards the annual hours requirement for State Aid purposes.

Resources

Additional information on the solar eclipse is available on the following websites:

Connection to the Standards

Instruction on the eclipse can be connected to the New York State Learning Standards for Science, Math, English Language Arts (ELA), Literacy in History, Social Studies, and the Arts:

New York State P-12 Science Learning Standards

New York State P-12 Science Learning Standards

Grade Level - Standard/Performance Indicator/Performance Expectation

  • P-ESS1-1 Observe and describe the apparent motions of the Sun, moon, and stars to recognize predictable patterns.
  • P-PS3-1 Plan and conduct an investigation to determine the effect of sunlight on Earth’s surface.
  • 1-ESS1-1 Use observations of the Sun, moon, and stars to describe patterns that can be predicted.
  • MS-ESS1-1 Develop and use a model of the Earth-Sun-moon system to describe the cyclic patterns of lunar phases, eclipses of the Sun and moon, and seasons.
  • MS-ESS1-3 Analyze and interpret data to determine scale properties of objects in the solar system.
  • HS-ESS1-4 Use mathematical or computational representations to predict the motion of orbiting objects in the solar system.
  • HS-ESS1-7 Construct an explanation using evidence to support the claim that the phases of the moon, eclipses, tides and seasons change cyclically.

Crosscutting Concept: Scale, Proportion, and Quantity - Natural objects exist from the very small to the immensely large.

New York State Next Generation Learning Standards for Mathematics

New York State Next Generation Learning Standards for Mathematics

  • PK-12 - Standard for Mathematical Practice 4: Model with Mathematics Mathematically proficient students can apply the mathematics they know to solve problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace. Mathematically proficient students who can apply what they know are comfortable making assumptions and approximations to simplify a complicated situation, realizing that these may need revision later. They can identify important quantities in a practical, map their relationships, and analyze those relationships mathematically to draw conclusions. They routinely interpret their mathematical results in the context of the situation and reflect on whether the results make sense, possibly improving the model if it has not served its purpose.
  • NY-PK.G.3: Explore two- and three-dimensional objects and use informal language to describe their similarities, differences, and other attributes.
  • NY-PK.G.4: Create and build shapes from components.
  • NY-K.G.4: Analyze, compare, and sort two- and three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, parts, and other attributes.
  • NY-K.G.5: Model objects in their environment by building and/or drawing shapes.
  • NY-1.G.2: Compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangles, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, and quarter-circles) or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape and compose new shapes from the composite shape. Note: Students do not need to learn formal names such as “right rectangular prism.”
  • NY-6.G.4: Represent three-dimensional figures using nets made up of rectangles and triangles and use the nets to find the surface area of these figures. Apply these techniques in the context of solving real-world and mathematical problems. Note: Three-dimensional figures include only right rectangular prisms, right rectangular pyramids, and right triangular prisms. When finding surface areas, all necessary measurements will be given.
  • NY-7.G.3: Describe the two-dimensional shapes that result from slicing three-dimensional solids parallel or perpendicular to the base. Note: Focus of standard is on plane sections resulting from the slicing of right rectangular prisms and right rectangular pyramids.
  • NY-8.G.9: Given the formulas for the volume of cones, cylinders, and spheres, solve mathematical and real-world problems.
  • GEO-G.GMD.4: Identify the shapes of plane sections of three-dimensional objects, and identify three-dimensional objects generated by rotations of two-dimensional objects. Note: Plane sections are not limited to being parallel or perpendicular to the base.
New York State Next Generation English Language Arts Learning Standards

English Language Arts

  • Reading Anchor Standard 7: Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats.
  • Writing Anchor Standard 6: Conduct research based on focused questions to demonstrate understanding of the subject under investigation.
  • Speaking and Listening Anchor Standard 2: Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats (including visual, quantitative, and oral).
  • Language Anchor Standard 6: Acquire and accurately use general academic and content-specific words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening; demonstrate independence in gathering and applying vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
New York State Learning Standards for Social Studies

Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

  • 6-8 - RST1: Cite specific evidence to support analysis of scientific and technical texts, charts, graphs, diagrams, etc. Understand and follow a detailed set of directions.
  • 6-8 - RST4: Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other content-specific words and phrases as they are used in scientific or technical sources.
  • 9-10 - RST1: Cite specific evidence to support analysis of scientific and technical texts, charts, diagrams, etc. attending to the precise details of the source. Understand and follow a detailed set of directions.
  • 9-10 - RST4: Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other content-specific words and phrases as they are used in scientific or technical sources; describe how the inclusion of charts, graphs, diagrams, data influence conclusion(s).
  • 11-12 - RST1: Cite specific evidence to support analysis of scientific and technical texts, charts, diagrams, etc. attending to the precise details of the source, and attending to important distinctions the author makes and to any gaps or inconsistencies in the account.
  • 11-12 - RST4: Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other content-specific words and phrases as they are used in scientific or technical sources.
New York State Learning Standards for the Arts

Visual Arts Standards

Pre-Kindergarten

  • VA:Cn10.1.PK a. Create art that tells a story about a life experience

First Grade

  • VA:Cn10.1.1 a. Create works of art about events in home, school, or community life

Eighth Grade

  • VA:Cr1.2.8 a. Collaboratively shape an artistic investigation of an aspect of present-day life by using a contemporary practice of art and design

High School

  • VA:Cn11.2.HSI a. Investigate how skills used in developing artistic solutions can be applied to study in other disciplines, and explore how they are sought -after work force attributes in other fields
  • VA:Cn11.2.HSII a. Explore past and current examples of artists working together with other professionals to generate solutions to ecological, social and/or economic problems