Office of P-12 Education

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Allowances to State-Supported Schools for the Blind, Deaf, Severely Physically Disabled and Severely Emotionally Disturbed

Bilingual Education

Career and Technical Education Improvement Act (CTEIA) Criminal Offender

Career and Technical Education Improvement Act (CTEIA) Services for Nontraditional Activities

Career and Technical Education Improvement Act (Perkins IV) Title I Basic Grants for Secondary and Adult Career and Technical Education Programs

Charter Schools

Community Schools

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals - (DACA)

Education of Children with Disabilities

Education of Native Americans

Extended Learning Time

Extended School Day/ School Violence Prevention Program (ESD/SVP)

Health Education Program

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

Learning Technology Grant (LTG) Program

Mentoring and Tutoring

Migrant Education

National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs

New York State Center for School Safety

NYS Universal Prekindergarten

Nonpublic Mandated Services Aid

QUALITYstarsNY

​Postsecondary Education Aid for Native Americans

Priority Full-Day and Expanded Half-Day Prekindergarten

Removing Barriers to CTE Programs for ELL's and SWD Grant

School Bus Driver Safety Training Program

Special Milk Program

Statewide Universal Full-Day Prekindergarten Program

Summer Food Program

Sumer Food Services Program (SFSP)

​Targeted Prekindergarten (TPK)

The Children's Institute (formerly the Primary Mental Health Project)

Title I, Part A - Improving Basic Programs Operated by Local Education Agencies

Title I, Part A - School Improvement - Accountability

Title I, Part C - Education of Migratory Children

Title I, Part D - Prevention and Intervention Programs for Children and Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk, Subpart I - State Agency Programs and Subpart 2 Local Agency Programs

Title I, Part G Advance Placement Test Fee Program

Title I, Section 1003(g)

Title II, Part A - Teacher and Principle Training and Recruiting Fund (Formula)

Title III, Language Instruction for English Language Learners Students

Title VI, Part B - 21st Century Community Learning Centers

Title VI, Part B, Subpart 2 - Rural and Low-Income School Program

Title X, Part C - Homeless Education 

Allowances to State-Supported Schools for the Blind, Deaf, Severely Physically Disabled and Severely Emotionally Disturbed

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The allowances to 11 State-supported schools provide for the education of students who are deaf, blind, severely physically or emotionally disabled under §4201 of the Education Law and Chapter 1060 of the Laws of 1974.  The State-supported schools receiving aid under this Program are:

     Schools for the Deaf:

            Cleary School for the Deaf, Ronkonkoma (Suffolk County)

            Lexington School for the Deaf, New York (Queens)

            Mill Neck Manor School for the Deaf, Mill Neck (Nassau County)

            New York School for the Deaf, White Plains (Westchester County)

            Rochester School for the Deaf, Rochester (Monroe County)

            St. Francis DeSales School for the Deaf, New York (Brooklyn)

            St. Joseph's School for the Deaf, New York (Bronx)

            St. Mary's School for the Deaf, Buffalo (Erie County)

     Schools for the Blind:

            New York Institute for Special Education, New York (Bronx)

            Lavelle School for the Blind, New York (Bronx)

     Schools for Physically Disabled Children:

            Henry Viscardi School, Albertson (Nassau County)

Chapter 1066 of the Laws of 1974, which added §4204-a to the Education Law, provides for State reimbursement of tuition costs for the education of deaf infants below the age of three, and their parents attending programs approved by the Commissioner at various public and private facilities, including schools for the deaf listed in §4201 of the Education Law.

Chapter 58 of the laws of 2011 amended sections 4204, 4204-a, 4204-b and 4207 of the Education Law to require school districts, beginning with the 2011-12 school year, to pay tuition for the ten-month school year based on a per pupil charge to the §4201 schools in the first instance.  The State reimburses a school district for the positive difference between its tuition payments and basic contribution. The State pays the §4201 schools directly for summer school special education programs, their ten-month school year deaf infant program, residential maintenance costs, and also any applicable Dormitory Authority debt service costs.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Education Law Sections 4201 and 4204-a

State Regulation:      8NYCRR Part 200

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $135.8m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: 1531 (1412 school-age/preschool and 119 deaf infant).

Bilingual Education

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The following is a summary of the proposed grants and contracts under the Bilingual Categorical Funds which support initiatives to address the needs of English Language Learners (ELL); consistent with the Regents Policy Paper on Bilingual Education EL 3204, Commissioner's Regulation Part 154; the Department's Strategic Plan for Raising Standards (Regents Reform Agenda and Race to the Top), with special focus on the implementation best practices for the Education of ELLs.

The activities specifically addressed are in the areas of higher standards, new assessments involving ELLs, the preparation and certification of bilingual and ESL staff to incorporate the standards and assessments into the curriculum for ELL, parent empowerment to increase their knowledge and understanding of ELL requirements, capacity building at the school and district levels and most especially, the provision of equitable services for ELLs.  Many of these initiatives will focus on high-need districts.

 

Programs / Initiatives:

1.Regional Bilingual Education - Resource Networks (RBE-RN) will create resources and provide professional development and technical assistance to school districts, especially those where English Language Learners (ELLs) fail to meet State/Federal standards/requirements, in order to build and/or strengthen their capacity to serve ELLs through CR Part 154 and ESEA Title III programs. 

2.CUNY NYS Initiative on Emergent Bilinguals (CUNY-NYSIEB)

NYSED has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with the CUNY Graduate Center—Research Institute for the Study of Language in Urban Society (RISLUS) and PhD Program in Urban Education to continue to concentrate on increasing the capacities of schools that serve emergent bilingual students, aiming to improve their levels of educational achievement. Bridges will continue to support districts throughout the state to create programs for SIFE students.

3.The CR-ITI-BE is designed to increase the pool of certified bilingual and ESL teachers in New York (5 districts) by helping bilingual and ESL provisional preparatory teachers (PPT) meet the course requirements for certification in approved institutions of higher education (IHE).  This contract will be for 5 programs, 4 in New York City and 1 in Long Island.

4.The Two-Way Bilingual Education Program is designed to promote academic excellence in core subjects and to develop proficiency in two languages (one of which is English) in the English proficient and ELL students.  Grants will be awarded to schools to implement new two-way bilingual programs.

5.The BETLA Program was created to instill leadership skills in exemplary teachers who then work to support fellow teachers working with ELLs as well as preparing them to achieve educational leadership roles such as principals, superintendents etc. The CR-ITI-BE was created to increase the pool of certified ESL and Bilingual Education teachers in districts with large ELL populations, by helping Bilingual and ESL provisional preparatory teaches (PPT) meet course requirements for ESL and bilingual extension certifications.  The Westchester and NYC BETLA and CR-ITI-BE MOU will support bilingual and ESL teachers in Westchester, New York City (Bronx), Rochester, and Long Island.

6.HYLI is designed to develop leadership, public speaking skills, and an understanding of the NYS Legislative process in for 200 Hispanic (junior and senior) high school students studying NYS Law and Government.  Prior to attending a three-day institute, students receive training on the legislative process and then they select legislative bills to research and debate.  At the institute, students meet with legislators and debate actual legislative bills in a mock assembly session.  Students receive scholarships from legislators.

7.Online Leadership Program - A program to provide leadership development courses through online MOOCs that will help prepare teachers working with ELLs to develop new strategies aligned to the Common Core.  The Online Leadership Program MOU will support bilingual and ESL teachers statewide. 

8.Evaluation of Categorical Funds grant

 The purpose of this grant is to:

  • evaluate categorically-funded bilingual education programs (presently six program) to ensure that each meets the requirements and quality of the programs outlined in their approved RFPs;
  • assess the impact of these programs in terms of their expected outcomes in meeting the needs of limited English proficiency (LEP)/English language learners (ELLs) in New York State;
  • use information as a basis for renewal of all existing programs or for creation of new ones based on the availability of funds; and
  • report progress and make suggestions/recommendations to improve the quality of these programs.

9.Technical Assistance and Online Toolkit for Districts

A series of online tools and resources will be developed to assist districts in implementing programs and services for ELLs aligned with New York State’s requirements, including Education Law 3204 and 3602; Part 154 of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education (CR) for services to ELLs; general requirements under CR Parts 100, 117, 200; teacher certification requirements under CR Parts 80.9 and 80.10; and federal mandates under Titles I and III of the ESEA.11.

             10.World Language Pathways Curriculum and Assessment Initiative

The World Language Education Program in the department of Secondary Education and Youth Services, Queens College of the City University of New York, proposes a two-year project to develop curriculum and assessment tools and resources to support ELL and World Language programs.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Education Law §3602

State Regulation:      8NYCRR Part 154

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $14.5m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: N/A

Career and Technical Education Improvement Act (CTEIA) Criminal Offender

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CTEIA Incarcerated Program grants and State set-asides are made available to provide occupational skills instruction and support services to individuals incarcerated or institutionalized in county and State correctional facilities.  The purpose of the funding includes:

  • The establishment and/or enhancement of career and technical education programs for inmates that lead to employment of high-wage, high-skill, high-wage, high-demand areas.
  • The development on non-traditional career options.
  • The development or enhancement of transitional services that lead to employment for inmates who are completing their sentences and are preparing for release.
  • The improvement of equipment.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:        Carl D. Perkins CDEIA of 2006, PL 109-270, Title I, Part A for Incarcerated Programs

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Education Law §3203(7)

State Regulation:      8NYCRR Part 118

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                          

Federal-                       100%

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $0.51m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: N/A

Career and Technical Education Improvement Act (CTEIA) Services for Nontraditional Activities

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The New York State Project for Nontraditional Training and Employment works with agencies on meeting the Perkins IV accountability standards.  The project provides statewide technical assistance for gender equity under Perkins IV.  Services include:

  • Equity Resource Library

Books, manuals and videos are available for free loan to administrators and educators involved in Perkins-funded projects throughout New York State.  Our collection totals over 2,000 items.  Bibliographies of relevant topics are also available.

  • Web Site

The web site on Nontraditional Training and Employment provides up-to-date information on nontraditional careers and new and emerging careers, as well as strategies for recruiting, retaining and placing nontraditional students.  The site allows access to and online ordering from the Resource Library database.

  • State Development and Technical Assistance

Meeting the nontraditional performance indicators can be a complex and long-term process.  Staff development is available to meet your current needs.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:        Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act (CTEIA) of 2006, PL 109-270

Federal Regulation:  34 CFR Parts 400 & 403

State Statute:            

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                          

Federal-                       100%

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $0.15m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: N/A

Career and Technical Education Improvement Act (Perkins IV) Title I Basic Grants for Secondary and Adult Career and Technical Education Programs

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Allocations are generated for all school districts and boards of cooperative educational services (BOCES) in the State for secondary career and technical education programs.  School districts and BOCES that meet eligibility requirements for use of the funds may then apply for funds to support their career and technical education programs.  Individual school districts unable to meet the eligibility requirements may elect to return the money to the Department or join together with other school districts to form a consortium that meets the eligibility requirements. 

Potential Perkins IV allocations for adult career and technical education programs are generated for school districts and BOCES based on the number of students in career and technical education programs who are economically disadvantaged using federally approved criteria.  For 2012-2013, 15 school districts and BOCES with adult career and technical education programs were eligible to receive Perkins IV Title I Basic Grant funds for Postsecondary/Adult programs.  

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:        Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act of (CTEIA) of 2006, PL 109-270, Title I

Federal Regulation:  34 CFR Parts 400 & 403

State Statute:            

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                          

Federal-                       100%

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $44.2m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: TBD

Charter Schools

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  • Federal Fund -- (Title V, Part B)

The purpose of the federal Charter Schools Program (CSP) is to expand the number of high-quality charter schools available to students across the nation by providing financial assistance for the planning, program design, and initial implementation of public charter schools, evaluation of the effects of charter schools, and dissemination of information about charter schools and successful practices in charter schools.

In New York, the Charter Schools Office in the Office of School Innovation makes funds available for charter school programs for planning and implementing grants to provide assistance to approved charter schools regarding the implementation of an approved charter.  Funds are also available on a competitive basis for the dissemination of successful practices in charter schools.

  • State Fund

The Charter Schools Stimulus Fund provides assistance to approved charter schools through a competitive RFP process.  These funds are suballocated to SUNY, who makes the funds available for the expenses associated with the acquisition renovation or construction of school facilities.  Funds are available only to schools in private, not public space.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:        84.282A Public Charter Schools

Federal Regulation:  CFR Part XX, EDGAR as applicable

State Statute:             Education Law Article 56; Finance Law §97-sss New Charter School Law

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           33%

Federal-                       67%

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $14.6m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: N/A

Community Schools

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“Community Schools” are public schools that emphasize family engagement and are characterized by strong partnerships and additional supports for students and families designed to counter environmental factors that impede student achievement. Fundamentally, Community schools coordinate and maximize public, non‐profit and private resources to deliver critical services to students and their families, thereby increasing student achievement and generating other positive outcomes.  Eligible school districts target school buildings as ‘community hubs’ to deliver co‐located or school‐linked academic, health, mental health, nutrition, counseling, legal and/or other services to students and their families in a manner that will lead to improved educational and other outcomes.

This program reflects the recommendations of the New NY Education Reform Commission and is consistent with the New York State Board of Regents advocacy for establishing programs for students and families that provide academic enrichment activities along with a broad array of student and family development opportunities within their communities.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:            

State Regulation: Education Law § 3641 subdivision 6      

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $15M

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED:

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals– (DACA)

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This program allows undocumented youth who were brought to the United States as children and who meet certain criteria to be considered for work authorization and relief from deportation. Eligibility for this program applies to undocumented youth over the age of 15 and under 31 who had arrived in the US before they turned 16 and who have pursued or are pursuing education or military services. Young adults who achieve DACA status will be given temporary relief from the possibility of deportation and would be able to legally live and work in the United States.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:                    

State Regulation:                 

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $1 m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED:

Education of Children with Disabilities

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§4410 Preschool Services

Under §4410 of Education Law, school districts are responsible for assuring the provision of special education services to eligible preschool children with disabilities (ages 3-4 years). Counties contract with approved programs and service providers selected by local boards of education and make 100 percent payment to providers.  Pursuant to Chapter 642 of the Laws of 1996, counties are reimbursed by the State for 59.5 percent of the approved costs for services.

 

§4408 Summer School Services

Children with disabilities, ages 5-21 years, may receive special programs and/or services during July and August, if recommended by the Committee on Special Education. The county of residence is responsible for 10 percent of the cost and the local school district is responsible for 20 percent of the cost.  The State Education Department is responsible for the remaining 70 percent of the cost.  Costs incurred for services provided during July and August to children with disabilities in the State schools in Rome and Batavia and the State-supported §4201 schools are included. Also included in this account are payments for summer students who are placed in Office of Mental Health residential treatment facilities.  Pursuant to Chapter 82 of the Laws of 1995, beginning in 1995-1996, no single payee may receive more than 45 percent of the appropriation for this Program.  In addition, no payments will be made after July 1, 1996 based on a claim submitted later than three years after the end of the school year in which services were rendered except in cases where such payment is the result of a court order, judgment, or final audit.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Education Law Sections 4408 and 4410

State Regulation:      8NYCRR Part 200

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $1,405m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: 4410 - 41,823  /  4408 - N/A

Education of Native Americans

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New York State, in accordance with Article 83 of the Education Law, provides for educational services through tuition contracts with 13 public school districts for approximately 3,000 Native American students in Grades K-12 that live on nine Indian reservations.  The Department also contracts with three of the contracting school districts for the operation of three, State-owned reservation schools on the St. Regis Mohawk, Onondaga and Tuscarora Indian Reservations.  The Education Department also contracts with nine public school districts and four commercial bus companies, including the Seneca Nation of Indians, for the transportation of these students.  School buses are also purchased by the State for use by the Salmon River and Massena School Districts to transport students living on the St. Regis Mohawk Indian Reservation.  School districts receive supplemental services money to provide additional educational support services solely for Native American students.

Department staff provides technical assistance to the contracting schools and reservation communities to improve the educational programs/services provided to Native American students, including better parent/school relationships, consultation with the nations/tribes, inclusion of Native American language/culture in the schools curriculum, and collaborative efforts in the school districts comprehensive plans to have all children achieve high standards.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Education Law Article 83, §§111, 3602, 3635 and 4101-4119

State Regulation:      8NYCRR Part 174

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $32.5m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: approximately 3,000

Extended Learning Time

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The purpose of the Extended Learning Time (ELT) competitive grant program is to provide grants to school districts or school districts in collaboration with not-for-profit community-based organizations (CBOs) to increase school-wide learning opportunities in high-quality extended school day, school week and/or extended school year programs with a focus on improving academic achievement. School-wide extended learning requires a transformation and redesign of the school calendar for all students in the school. The intent of this program is to provide school districts the opportunity to transform and redesign the school day, week and year in order to better meet the needs of its students and school community and improve student achievement.

Extended school-wide learning time enables schools to provide students with more individualized instruction, more time for honing core academic skills, and more enrichment activities that make learning relevant and engaging. It also provides critical time for teachers to collaborate to improve instruction aligned to the Common Core State Standards. Schools that apply for the competitive grant program must agree to expand learning time by adding at least 25 percent more time to the academic calendar beyond the current schedule.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:            

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           20M

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED:

Extended School Day/School Violence Prevention Program (ESD/SVP)

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ESD/SVP grant program will be awarding projects through public school districts, special act school and not for profit organizations collaborating with public school districts. Priority was given to applicants that included high-need public school districts as defined by districts ranked 1-4 on the Need/Resource Capacity Category Index, or have at least 50 Limited English Proficient (LEP) students. In order for an application to have received priority, at least 50% of the districts included in the application must have been on one of the priority lists.

The primary purpose of the ESD/SVP grant program is to provide a balance of academic enrichment and youth development activities. In addition, violence prevention strategies are utilized and implemented to assist in maintaining a positive school climate. Activities are provided during and after the school day. These activities may include; tutoring in areas of math, reading and science, recreation, student leadership development, peer intervention training, and conflict resolution programs.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Chapter 53 of the Laws of 2002

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $24.3m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: n/a

Health Education Program

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Funds will support targeted health education, services and activities of the New York State Center for  School Health (NYSCSH), NYS Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse MOU (beginning 11/1/14), and Kaleida Health Contract (Buffalo).

These funds are available for health-related programs focused on increasing the capacity of school districts and buildings to coordinate their school health education programs, health policies and supportive services, while directly increasing their capacity to deliver comprehensive evidence-based health instruction and professional development.  This will be accomplished in part by establishing a resource center to provide professional development and technical assistance to school health services and school health education staff.  Such health-related programs include but are not limited to, those providing health instruction and supportive services in health education (misuse of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs), nutrition, physical activity/education, coordinated school health, and acquired immune deficiency syndrome education (AIDS).

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Chapter 53 of the Laws of 2005

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $0.691m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: n/a

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

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IDEA makes it possible for states and local educational agencies to receive federal funds to assist in the education of students with disabilities ages 3-21.  In order to remain eligible for federal funds under the law, states must have policies and procedures in effect that comply with federal requirements including, but not limited to, policies and procedures that demonstrate:

1.All children and youth with disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disability, will receive a free appropriate public education at public expense.

2.Education of children and youth with disabilities will be based on a complete and individual evaluation and determination of eligibility.

3.An individualized education program is developed, reviewed and revised for every child or youth found eligible for special education.

4.To the maximum extent appropriate, all children and youth with disabilities will be educated  in the least restrictive environment and a continuum of alternative placements will be available.

5.The rights of children with disabilities and their parents are protected through procedural safeguards.

6.Children suspected of having disabilities are located through child find procedures.

7.Confidentiality of personally identifiable information will be ensured and protected.

8.The State has appropriate professional requirements that establish suitable qualifications for personnel providing special education and related services.

The federal government allocates funds to New York State based on a census of children ages 3-21 in the State.  A portion of the funds is allocated to schools based on the total school enrollment and the State’s poverty rate.

Each year, special education services are provided to approximately 41,823 students with disabilities, ages 3-5 and 396,152 students with disabilities, ages 6-21.  Federal discretionary dollars support initiatives such as statewide training and resources networks, parent centers, general oversight and monitoring activities, quality assurance and federal compliance.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:        Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Part B, 601-682, as amended, PL 108-446

Federal Regulation:  Title 34 CFR 300

State Statute:             Article 89, Article 81

State Regulation:      8NYCRR Parts 200 and 201

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                          

Federal-                       100%

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           School Age Total (regular) = $749 million

                                    Preschool (regular) = $31.5 million

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: 437,975

Learning Technology Grant (LTG) Program

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The Learning Technology Grant (LTG) Program provides funds to improve student academic performance in relation to the New York State learning standards (including the New York State P-12 Common Core Learning Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy and for Mathematics.

The Program is designed to enable collaborative partnerships of public and nonpublic schools to address the implementation of New York State learning standards through the use of technology.  LTGs provide funds for acquisition of both technology and staff development that will facilitate student learning.  As the effectiveness of educational technology depends upon adequate training in its use, expenditures for staff development must amount to at least 45 percent of the program budget and no more than 45 percent of the budget may be spent on hardware.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Chapter 153 of the Laws of 1997

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $3.28m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: Approx. 60,000 - program serves 63 of the lowest performing public schools and private school partners, balanced across NYC, Big 4, and rest-of state

Mentoring and Tutoring

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Hillside Work Scholarship Connection proposes to use $490,000 in funding from the New York State Department of Education during the 2016/2017 school year (January to June) to provide services to at-risk students in the Rochester City School District in our model program whose overachieving goal is student graduation. Our program also measures intermediate goals including:

  1. Improve academic performance, as evidenced by increased promotion, sufficient credits earned and/or timely graduation
  2. Improve attendance rates
  3. Decrease the rate of disciplinary referrals, as evidenced by a decrease in suspensions
  4. Increase the number of trained, job-ready students, as evidenced by active participation and completion of the Youth Employment Training Academy
  5. Increase employment, as evidenced by the number of students placed at employment sites.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:            

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $.49M

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED:

Migrant Education

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Funds are used to meet the unique needs of migrant students during the summer and regular school year.

Educational and support services are provided to children of migrant workers whose schooling has been disrupted and who are failing or in danger of failing; preschool children who require services in areas of health, nutrition and early childhood to ensure that they enter school ready to learn; adolescents who require assistance in the areas of credit accrual, school-to-work and postsecondary school activities; to out-of-school migrant youth who require assistance in language development, employment opportunities and/or involvement in education settings; and to parents of all eligible migrant children.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Chapter 53 of the Laws of 2001

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $89,000

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: 5,143

National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs

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Public school districts, nonprofit, nonpublic schools and residential childcare institutions are eligible to participate in these Programs.  Federal and State reimbursement is provided monthly for meals served to children that meet federal meal pattern requirements.  The amount of reimbursement for each meal is based on the family's eligibility for free, reduced price or full priced meals, which is determined by an annually approved application, direct certification letter or computer match with the local Department of Social Services or the Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance.  In addition, $.2275 in donated foods is available per day per lunch to each school food authority.

  • School Breakfast Programs

Chapter 537 of the Laws of 1976 mandated that school breakfast programs be instituted in all public schools in the City School Districts of Buffalo, New York City, Rochester, Syracuse and Yonkers. 

Chapter 798 of the Laws of 1980 required funding levels of $.11 for each free breakfast, $.12 for each reduced price breakfast and $.0025 for each full price breakfast.  Chapter 53 of the Laws of 1988 raised the State subsidy an additional $.05 for each reduced price breakfast to $.17.

Chapter 798 of the Laws of 1980 also authorized the reimbursement of all approved costs exceeding revenues associated with the federal school breakfast programs to school districts during their first year of operation, payable in the following year ("full cost reimbursement"). 

Section 389 of Chapter 57 of the Laws of 1993 added a new Subdivision c to §1 of Chapter 537 of the Laws of 1976 to require school districts to establish school breakfast programs no later than September 1, 1993 in public elementary schools categorized as "severe need."

Chapters 614 and 615 of the Laws of 1993 further amended the provisions for mandated school breakfast programs by extending the requirements to all public "severe need" schools beginning September 1, 1994 and to all elementary schools that were in the National School Lunch Program on or after January 1, 1993 no later than September 1, 1995.  Schools may obtain an annual exemption if they can document lack of need, economic hardship or other good cause.

  • National School Lunch Program

The Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1981 (PL 97-35) changed the State Revenue Matching Requirement for the National School Lunch Program.  For each school year, beginning with school year 1981-1982, the State Revenue Matching Requirement is equal to 30 percent of all federal §4 funds provided for reimbursement of lunches served to children in the school year 1980-1981, unless the §4 funds in a succeeding year exceed the amounts paid in 1980-1981. 

Projections for the breakfast and lunch programs will vary from year-to-year based on when holidays fall.  Both the days of the week of the holidays and the fiscal year where Easter occurs affect how schools allocate vacation time, which in turn impacts on days of service.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:        National School Lunch Act, Child Nutrition

Federal Regulation:  7 CFR 210, 220, 245

State Statute:            

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           5.5%

Federal-                       94.5%

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $825m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: Annually - Breakfast 95 million; Lunch 301 million (Average Daily Participation - Breakfast 560,000 and Lunch 1.7 million)

New York State Center for School Safety

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The New York State Center for School Safety is funded for the primary purpose to help make schools safer through its leadership that is consistent with the intent of the SAVE legislation. This includes the following:

  • Review updated school safety plans and provides technical assistance and staff development to schools in helping them complete safety plans.
  • Review updated school codes of conduct and provides technical assistance and staff development to schools in helping them complete the codes.
  • Provide safety and crisis management technical assistance to schools upon request of the school and/or the Department.
  • Conduct selected site reviews with SED staff for schools and charter schools designated as Persistently Dangerous (PD) as well as those identified for coordinated site visits.
  • Provide technical assistance to school districts, including staff development on the reporting procedures for Violent And Disruptive Incident Reporting (VADIR), the Dignity for All legislation, and the use of VADIR and other student conduct data to develop safer learning environments.
  • Inform practice through publication of online research briefs that reflect best practices in the field.
  • Respond to crisis situations and provide technical assistance to school staff to handle situations relating to school safety.
  • Respond to crisis calls from school staff and other providers.
  • Maintain regular and consistent communication with the Department regarding school safety issues.
  • Provide training and technical assistance to schools, under the direction of the State Education Department, on implementing the Safe Schools Against Violence in Education (SAVE) legislation and the Dignity for All legislation. Work collaboratively and cooperatively with the Student Support Services Regional Centers, the Statewide School Health Services Center and the Statewide Center for Student Support Services to review updated school safety plans and codes of conduct.
  • Support corrective action plan development for Schools identified as “Persistently Dangerous.”

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Safe Schools Against Violence Education Act Chapter 181, Laws of 2000

State Regulation:      8NYCRR 155.17; 100.2(L)(2); 100.2(dd); 100.2(gg)

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $0.466m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: n/a

NYS Universal Prekindergarten

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Universal Prekindergarten (UPK) was first implemented in 1998-1999 and has since then created the new entry point for public education.  Currently 443/675 districts operate UPK.  The goal is to provide four-year-olds with high quality, research based instruction that increases the number of children who enter kindergarten prepared to succeed.  Program goals include developing language and communication skills; promoting early literacy skills and critical thinking; and fostering the requisite social and emotional development and motor skills each child will need for school success. Additionally, the program is designed to assure that the prekindergarten content is aligned with the New York State Common Core Learning Standards and connected to the kindergarten and early elementary curricula.  This is done through the use of The Prekindergarten Foundation for the Common Core.

One of the keys to success of the UPK program is the requirement that districts collaborate with community partners.  These collaborations have allowed districts to reach more children in a wider range of settings, thus establishing partnerships between public schools and other settings where young children receive early education.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Chapter 436 of the Laws of 1997 established UPK; Section 3602(e) expanded UPK and established uniform quality standards.

State Regulation:      Subpart 151-1 of the Commissioner’s Regulations were revised and are effective January 2008  

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $378.2 million

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED:   In 2013-2014: 102,114 four-year-olds were served.

Nonpublic Mandated Services Aid

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Reimbursement of mandated services to nonpublic schools may be made for the actual costs related to complying with certain State mandates, if eligibility requirements are met. To be eligible for reimbursement, the school must:

  • Provide instruction in all required subjects according to §3204 of the Education Law.
  • Require pupils to attend full-time instruction according to §3205 of the Education Law.
  • Not are the recipients of other State or local aid, directly or indirectly (e.g., tuition payments for the disabled).
  • Be a not-for-profit institution.

The administrator should keep track of and be able to document the amount of time spent by faculty and staff in complying with State mandates. Expenses incurred in fulfilling mandates are reimbursable. These include, but are not limited to, the following activities:

  • BEDS forms.
  • Pupil attendance records.
  • Elementary school tests.
  • Regents Exams.
  • Regents Competency Tests.
  • Regents Scholarship applications.
  • Registration of high schools.
  • Graduation reports.
  • Documentation of incorporation of home and career skills, technology education and library and information skills into other courses.
  • Comprehensive School Improvement Plan (for schools identified by the Commissioner as having to develop a Plan).

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Chapter 53 of the Laws of 2003

State Regulation:      8NYCRR Part 176

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $158.7m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: 1,200 nonpublic schools

QUALITYstarsNY

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The $5 million budget appropriation to QUALITYstarsNY will support the ongoing participation of the approximately 600 early childhood programs currently enrolled. It will also support strategic expansion of QUALITYstarsNY resources and supports into high needs communities across the state, to ensure that QUALITYstarsNY is serving all 10 regions.  This means that areas in the Mohawk Valley where QUALITYstarsNY currently does not have a presence will be added. This budget will also support the creation and implementation of “Start with Stars,” an intervention-based program designed to prepare marginal and/or high need programs to rapidly improve their quality in order to meet licensing requirements and address issues that impede full participation in QUALITYstarsNY. Finally, the budget will further support statewide capacity building efforts to ensure that QUALITYstarsNY programs can access a wide range of high quality, tailored professional development opportunities so that they can best serve New York’s youngest learners.

Support existing and new programs through all aspects of the participation lifecycle.

  • Recruitment and Orientation
    • Quality Improvement Specialists (QI Specialists) will provide recruitment sessions in areas targeted for program expansion and QUALITYstarsNY will accept programs to participate based on a set of eligibility criteria.
    • QI Specialists will host multiple orientation sessions to introduce programs to the different components of the participation process, such as: The Standards, The Aspire Registry, and accessing resources, such as the Quality Improvement Plan Fund (QIP Fund) and Quality Scholars.
      • The Aspire Registry will provide technical assistance and training on how to use the system and leverage its many tools and benefits.
  • Standards Inventory and Provisional Rating (applies to all programs beginning in FY 2017)
    • QI Specialists will support administrators and providers to conduct a Standards Inventory, a baseline assessment of their program’s quality as measured by their ability to meet the 75 QUALITYstarsNY Program Standards.
    • QI Specialists will support programs to submit supporting evidence to QUALITYstarsNY’s online Portal and documentation of their staff’s qualifications and experiences to The Aspire Registry.
    • QUALITYstarsNY’s rating team will assess submitted evidence and documentation and issue and communicate a Provisional Rating to sites and to SED.
    • Provisional ratings will inform the QIP and determine the resources programs are able to access.
  • Environment Rating Scales & Active Rating
    • Programs that receive Provisional Ratings of three (3) stars and higher will receive ERS Assessments.
    • QUALITYstarsNY will work with a skilled subcontractor to assess 50% of classrooms/groups in each qualifying program using the appropriate scale (ECERS-R, ITERS-R, FCCERS-R).
    • The QUALITYstarsNY rating team will incorporate ERS results into the Provisional Rating to issue and communicate Active Ratings to sites and to SED. (Programs that receive a Provisional Rating of one or two stars are not eligible for ERS Assessments, and their Provisional Rating becomes their Active Rating).
    • From the Provisional Rating, all programs (whether or not they receive ERS assessments,) will begin working on improving quality, examining their current practices, policies and procedures and accessing a wide range of resources and professional development to meet additional standards and improve their overall quality.
  • Continuous Quality Improvement
    • After the Active Rating, programs will work continuously with their QI Specialist towards achieving their QIP goals and setting new goals as existing goals are met.
    • Programs will continue to access resources including, but not limited to: monthly onsite visits with coaches, QIP Funds to enhance the quality of the learning environment, Quality Scholars funds to support professional development goals, learning communities, and local resources and opportunities identified by their QI Specialists.
      • QUALITYstarsNY will regularly monitor progress to ensure programs are on track to meeting QIP goals and benchmarks.
  • Develop and Implement “Start with Stars” Pilot
    • Establish relationship with licensing partners to refer programs with violations to participate and share data with QUALITYstarsNY.
    • Establish protocols and procedures related to working with this population to ensure that individualized coaching and supports will allow programs to meet licensing requirements within 6 months and be able to transition to full QUALITYstarsNY participation.
  • Increase Statewide Capacity to provide high quality services to QUALITYstarsNY Programs:
    • Identify high quality trainers and training organization partners and ensure they have requisite credentials and experience necessary to provide training and professional development to QUALITYstarsNY programs based on their needs.
    • In 2016, QUALITYstarsNY will support at least 3 highly trained NYS trainers to become “Anchors,” on the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale tool. This will allow NYS to create and maintain a consistent workforce of trained and reliable ERS assessors to conduct independent assessments of QUALITY program quality and provide technical assistance and support, as appropriate.
  • Improve database functionality and reporting
    • Transition to a new database service provider that is better equipped to meet QUALITYstarsNY’s goals to:
      • Increase the quality and reliability of data collected and measured
      • Eliminate integration errors with The Aspire Registry
      • Develop more robust reports for staff and stakeholders
      • Increase the user friendliness of system for administrators and program staff
  • Internal/Administrative Activities:
    • Provide regular (monthly) updates to SED via conference calls/webinars and provide quarterly updates to include high level overviews in addition to specific data.
    • Coordinate services and efforts with entities currently also serving QUALITYstarsNY sites.
    • Cultivate and maintain strategic partnerships
    • Provide systematic opportunities for QUALITYstarsNY sites to access regional high quality professional development opportunities aligned with the Standards.
    • Regularly aggregate and analyze programs data to ensure efficacy and validity of various implementation processes.
  • Evaluation
  •            Work with the PDI Director of Research and Evaluation to consider evaluation opportunities, including validation studies.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:

Federal Regulation:

State Statute:             Chapter 53 of the Laws of 2016

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-

Total-                           $5,000,000

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: to be determined

Postsecondary Education Aid for Native Americans

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Education Law, §4118, provides funding for Native American students for attendance at approved, accredited institutions within New York State.  Student aid is granted annually for up to four years to each Native American student who qualifies.  Students enrolled in programs requiring five years to complete, for example, architecture, can be funded for five years.  Student aid is granted for less than four years if the duration of the postsecondary program is less than four years.  Eligible students must complete an application form and submit proof of tribal enrollment showing they are a tribal member or a child of an enrolled member, be a State resident, a high school graduate or GED recipient, and be accepted to an accredited New York State institution.  As of May 2014, full-time students (12 or more credit hours) are eligible to receive $1,000 per semester.  Part-time students (less than 12 credit hours) are eligible to receive aid pro-rated at $85.00 per credit hour.  Students must maintain at least a 2.0 semester grade point average in order to continue receiving aid.  Aid provided is a grant available for students to use for any educational related expense.  Approximately 300-400 students each semester are awarded this grant.  All eligible students meeting application requirements and filing deadlines will be funded.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Education Law §4118

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $0.598m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: 300-400

Priority Full-Day and Expanded Half-Day Prekindergarten

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The purpose of the Priority Full-day Prekindergarten and Expanded Half-day Prekindergarten Grant Program for High Need Students is to increase the availability of high quality prekindergarten placements for the highest need children and schools within New York State’s public school districts.  This grant initiative builds on the foundation established by the allocational Universal Prekindergarten (UPK) program.  Grant funds can be used to create new full-day prekindergarten placements, convert existing half-day placements to full-day, or create a limited number of new half-day placements designated for higher need children in lower wealth school districts.  This prekindergarten grant program seeks to significantly enhance program quality by requiring grantees to adopt program quality standards including valid and reliable measures of environmental quality, the quality of teacher-student interactions, and student outcomes. 

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Chapter 53, Section 1 of the Laws of 2013   

State Regulation:      8 NYCRR, Subpart 151-1      

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                          [$25 m]                       

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: 6,054

Removing Barriers to CTE Programs for ELL’s and SWD Grant

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Funding to provide Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs with support and resources to eliminate barriers to Students With Disabilities (SWD) and English Language Learners (ELL) participation in CTE programs and activities as well as promote gender diversity in non-traditional career paths.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:

Federal Regulation:

State Statute:            

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-

Total-                           $1m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: N/A

School Bus Driver Safety Training Program

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The School Bus Driver Safety Training Program is a comprehensive education program for school bus drivers, monitors, attendants, and school bus driver instructors (SBDIs) in the latest techniques and information concerning safe pupil transportation.  The program utilizes a statewide network of approximately 65 master instructors who assist the Department in the development of the annual Professional Development Seminar (PDS).  The curriculum developed for this day long training seminar for SBDIs focuses on two to three major topics each year and provides SBDIs with the opportunity to improve their teaching skills.  Each year the Department establishes a different safety campaign.  SBDIs disseminate the training and information provided in the PDS to all school bus drivers, monitors and attendants when they conduct the two required refresher training sessions for these employees each year.

For the 2012-13 school year SED intends to issue a Request for Proposals (RFPs) to school districts, boards of cooperative educational services (BOCES), and nonprofit agencies to develop new school bus safety training curricula for students in grades kindergarten through twelve, including teenage drivers, walkers and parents.  In addition we will issue RFP's to create  Internet Versions of the Basic Course of Instruction for Drivers and the Professional Development Seminar for SBDIs, and others to provide for annual updates of the Basic Course and District Safety Review.  SED also intends to continue funding for existing contracts for the PDS Curriculum Materials, contract extensions with Safety Rules for new Basic, Advanced, Pre-Services and SBDI Courses, existing contracts for the PDS Program Delivery, SBDI Newsletter and School Bus Driver Database Contracts with Pupil Transportation Safety Institute.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Chapter 53 of the Laws of 2008

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $0.4m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: 300K

Special Milk Program

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This Program is available to schools that do not participate in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs and for children in half-day pre-kindergarten and half-day kindergarten classes that are in schools with the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs, but who do not have access to the programs.  The federal subsidy, per 8 ounces of milk, keeps milk costs lower to families and helps farmers by encouraging the consumption of milk.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:        U.S. Child Nutrition Act PL 89-642

Federal Regulation:  7 CFR, Chapter II, Part 215

State Statute:            

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                          

Federal-                       100%

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $0.57m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: 3.7 million annually; 22,000 daily

Statewide Universal Full-Day Prekindergarten Program

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The Statewide Universal Full-Day Prekindergarten Program (SUFDPK) was created by Chapter 53 of the Laws of 2014 and appropriated $340 million for prekindergarten grants to incentivize and fund universal full-day prekindergarten programs in accordance with Section 3602-ee of the Education Law.  Funding for this program is directly tied to the level of certification of the primary classroom teacher.  A Request for Proposals (RFP) has been issued by the State Education Department and grant awards are expected to be made in late July.  Program goals include creating high quality full day prekindergarten programs that assist children in developing language and communication skills; promoting early literacy skills and critical thinking; and fostering the requisite social and emotional development and motor skills necessary for school success. Additionally, the program is designed to assure that the prekindergarten content is aligned with the New York State Common Core Learning Standards and connected to the kindergarten and early elementary curricula.  This is done through the use of The Prekindergarten Foundation for the Common Core.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Chapter 53 of the Laws of 2014 established SUFDPK; Section 3602(ee).

State Regulation:      

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $340 million

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED:   This program is not in the implementation phase until September of 2014.  An RFP has been issued for districts to apply for the funding.  

Summer Food Program

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For the past twelve years, New York State has provided additional per meal reimbursement each spring to Summer Food Program sponsors.  The reimbursement is for breakfasts, lunches, suppers and/or snacks for each meal that meets meal pattern requirements.  In addition, camps and migrant sites receive only this State reimbursement for “fourth meal supplements” which are not eligible for federal reimbursement.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Chapter 53 of the Laws of 2004

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $3.049m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: approximately 400,000 per day

Summer Food Services Program (SFSP)

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On October 1, 1998, the New York State Education Department assumed responsibility for all schools and government entities in New York State participating in the SFSP. On October 1, 2002, the Education Department began administering the SFSP for sponsors that are private, nonprofit organizations and residential camps.  The Child Nutrition Reauthorization Act of 2004 reauthorized funding for SFSP through fiscal year 2009.  This was extended through 2010 and is currently available through December 5, 2010.

The SFSP provides nutritious meals for low-income children in the summer when school is not in session.  In 2010 in New York State, 302 sponsors served approximately 325,000 children in 3,035 sites.   The SFSP in New York State is the largest in the Country.

The 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act, commonly called the Welfare Reform Act, reduced federal subsidies that sponsors receive for meals served and eliminated the federal subsidy for a fourth daily meal provided in summer camps and programs that primarily service migrant children.  Since 1997, the New York State Legislature has appropriated $3.3 million for SFSP sponsors every year to help offset the federal cuts in reimbursement.  In 2008, the amount was reduced to 3,234,000.  It was also reduced 1.1 percent for claims after September 16, 2010.

There is a growing concern that despite outreach initiatives, on average, only one in six children eligible for free and reduced priced meals during the school year participates in SFSP.

The State Education Department focuses its attention on increasing the number of sponsors and sites in both urban and rural areas to encourage increased participation by needy children throughout the State.  The State Education Department also focuses on increasing the number of service days by existing sponsors. A variety of outreach initiatives including subway posters and public service announcements in English and Spanish are implemented.  A variety of strategies are used to target low-income families to make them aware of the nutrition benefits available for their children so they return to school in September well-nourished and ready to learn.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:        National School Lunch Act

Federal Regulation:  7 CFR 225

State Statute:            

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           6%

Federal-                       94%

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $52m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: 16 million

Targeted Prekindergarten (TPK)

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The Targeted Prekindergarten Program, formerly known as Experimental Prekindergarten, was established in 1966 to provide high quality preschool education to four-year old children from families who are economically disadvantaged.  The goal is to prepare them for success in school.  In 2006-2007, the Targeted Prekindergarten program was merged with the Universal Prekindergarten program.  As a result, the only remaining Targeted Prekindergarten Programs are those operated by BOCES, which are not eligible to receive Universal Prekindergarten funds directly. 

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:            

State Regulation: 8NYCRR Subpart 151-2

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           $1,303,900

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                          

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: During the 2015-2016 school year approximately 300 students were served by the Targeted Prekindergarten program.

The Children's Institute (formerly the Primary Mental Health Project)

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The Children’s Institute has developed and provided prevention-oriented programs based on sound research to children since 1957. Several structured prevention and early intervention programs are provided to students, including:

  • Primary Project - A program developed for the early detection and prevention of school adjustment and learning problems in primary grade children.
  • A.C.T.- For the Children (Assisting Children Through Transition) - An interdisciplinary parent education program designed to provide separating parents with information and skills to reduce the stress of family change and protect their children from ongoing conflict.
  • Resiliency Program - A program that uses the results of research in factors affecting resiliency to address the needs of children placed at risk by their environment.
  • Study Buddy Program - A program that pairs primary grade students for class work.
  • Pre-K Preliminary Project - An extension of Primary Project that has been adopted for four-year-old children.

The Children’s Institute has proven effective at both improving educational achievement and behavioral adjustment.  Using a prevention-oriented approach, the Children’s Institute emphasizes:

  • A focus on young children before problems root.
  • The provision of active screening to identify children experiencing significant early school adjustment problems.
  • Services to identify children through the use of carefully selected, trained and supervised nonprofessional help agents.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Chapter 53 of the Laws of 2002

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $0.89m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: n/a

Title I, Part A - Improving Basic Programs Operated by Local Education Agencies

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The purpose of Title I, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) is to ensure that all children have a fair, equal, and significant opportunity to obtain a high-quality education and reach, at a minimum, proficiency in challenging State academic achievement standards and State academic assessments.  It provides financial assistance through State education agencies to local educational agencies to meet the educational needs of children who are failing, or are most at risk of failing the State’s challenging academic achievement standards and State academic assessments in schools with high concentrations of children from low-income families.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:        NCLB 2002 PL 107-110

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:            

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                          

Federal-                       100%

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $1.08b

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: approximately 950,000

Title I, Part A - School Improvement -Accountability

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Title I School Improvement funds are to be used to support local educational agencies (LEAs) that:

  • Serve the lowest achieving schools.
  • Demonstrate the greatest need for such funding.
  • Demonstrate the strongest commitment to ensuring that such funds are used to enable the lowest achieving schools to meet the progress goals in their school improvement plans.

A portion of the Title I allocation (4 percent) is set aside, as required by federal legislation, for this purpose in order to increase the opportunity for all students in such schools to meet New York State’s high content and student performance standards.  The law further requires that the State education agency allocate funds to the LEAs for schools identified as Priority and Focus Schools.

The funding is for designated LEAs and schools to support the implementation of the goals identified in the required District Comprehensive Improvement Plans (DCIP) and School Comprehensive Education Plans (SCIP) under the Elementary and Secondary Education (ESEA)  Act, §1116(b), as modified by the ESEA Flexibility Waiver (May 2012).

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:        ESEA Act of 2001, PL 107-334, §Title I, 1003(a)

Federal Regulation:  34 CFR Parts 200, 201, 203, 205 and 212

State Statute:            

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                          

Federal-                       100%

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $43.2m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: n/a

Title I, Part C - Education of Migratory Children

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Funds are to be used to meet the unique needs of migrant students during the summer and regular school year.

Educational and support services are provided to children of migrant workers whose schooling has been disrupted and who are failing or in danger of failing; preschool children who require services in areas of health, nutrition and early childhood to ensure that they enter school ready to learn; adolescents who require assistance in the areas of credit accrual, school-to-work and postsecondary school activities; to out-of-school migrant youth who require assistance in language development, employment opportunities and/or involvement in education settings; and to parents of all eligible migrant children.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:        No Child Left Behind Act of 2001

Federal Regulation:  Title 34 CFR

State Statute:            

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                          

Federal-                       100%

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $9.6m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: 8,000

Title I, Part D - Prevention and Intervention Programs for Children and Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk, Subpart I - State Agency Programs and Subpart 2 - Local Agency Programs

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The purpose of §1401 is:

  • To improve educational services for children and youth in local and State institutions for neglected or delinquent children and youth so that such children and youth have the opportunity to meet the same challenging State academic content standards and challenging State student academic achievement standards that all children in the State are expected to meet.
  • To provide such children and youth with the services needed to make a successful transition from institutionalization to further schooling or employment.
  • To prevent at-risk youth from dropping out of school, and to provide dropouts, and children and youth returning from correctional facilities or institutions for neglected or delinquent children and youth with a support system to ensure their continued education.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:        No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 PL 107-110

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:            

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                          

Federal-                       100%

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $2.7m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: approximately 32,000

Title I, Part G Advance Placement Test Fee Program

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The purposes of this part are —

1.to support local efforts to raise academic standards through advanced placement programs, and thus further increase the number of students who participate and succeed in advanced placement programs;

2.to encourage more  students who take advanced placement courses each year but do not take advanced placement exams each year, to demonstrate their achievements through taking the exams;

3.to build on the many benefits of advanced placement programs for students, which benefits may include the acquisition of skills that are important to many employers, Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores that are 100 points above the national averages, and the achievement of better grades in secondary school and in college than the grades of students who have not participated in the programs;

4.to increase the availability and broaden the range of schools, including middle schools, that have advanced placement and pre-advanced placement programs;

5.to demonstrate that larger and more diverse groups of students can participate and succeed in advanced placement programs;

6.to provide greater access to advanced placement and pre-advanced placement courses and highly trained teachers for low-income and other disadvantaged students;

7.to provide access to advanced placement courses for secondary school students at schools that do not offer advanced placement programs, increase the rate at which secondary school students participate in advanced placement courses, and increase the numbers of students who receive advanced placement test scores for which college academic credit is awarded;

8.to increase the participation of low-income individuals in taking advanced placement tests through the payment or partial payment of the costs of the advanced placement test fees; and

9.to increase the number of individuals that achieve a baccalaureate or advanced degree, and to decrease the amount of time such individuals require attaining such degrees.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:        No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 PL 107-110, Sect 1702

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:            

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                          

Federal-                       100%

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $2.9M

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: n/a

Title I, Section 1003(g)

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In April 2010, the United States Department of Education (USDE) awarded the New York State Education Department (SED) over $308 million in School Improvement Grant (SIG) funds under Section 1003(g) to support dramatic school change efforts in New York’s Persistently Lowest Achieving (PLA) schools.  In May of 2012, USDE approved SED’s Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Flexibility Waiver.  This waiver allowed SED to revise the state’s accountability system, replacing schools in improvement, corrective action, restructuring and persistently lowest achieving schools, with Focus Schools and Districts, and Priority Schools.

To be eligible for funding, districts and schools must identify and commit to implement one of four USDE prescribed intervention models in Priority Schools:

  • Turnaround
  • Restart
  • Transformation
  • School Closure

Districts that can demonstrate the ability to fully and effectively implement one or more of the school intervention models are awarded 1003(g) School Improvement implementation grants for three school years, in an amount of up to $2 million per approved school, per school year.

More information on the intervention model requirements, as well as guidance on implementation, can be found at: http://www.p12.nysed.gov/accountability/T1/titleia/sig1003g/home.html.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:        No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 PL 107-110

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:            

State Regulation:      Commissioner’s Regulation 100.2(p)

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                          

Federal-                       100%

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $32.6m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: Currently, 96 schools

Title II, Part A - Teacher and Principal Training and Recruiting Fund (Formula)

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The purposes of the Title II, Part A-Teacher and Principal Training and Recruiting Fund Program are to increase student achievement through intensive, sustained, and high quality teacher and principal professional development; to increase the recruitment and retention of highly qualified teachers in classrooms and highly qualified principal and assistant principals in schools; and to ensure that highly qualified and experienced teachers are equitably distributed to high poverty and minority students buildings, classrooms and districts across NYS (at rates equal to, or greater than, low-poverty and non-minority students).

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:        No Child Left Behind Act PL 107-110

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:            

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                          

Federal-                       100%

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $174.9m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: formula allocation provided to all NYS Districts and Charter Schools; and district allocations include equitable participation portion for non-public schools

Title II, Part B - Mathematics and Science Partnerships

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The Mathematics and Science Partnerships Program is intended to increase the academic achievement of students in mathematics and science by enhancing the content knowledge and teaching skills of classroom teachers. Partnerships between high-need school districts and the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) faculty in institutions of higher education are at the core of these improvement efforts. Other partners include public charter schools or other public schools, businesses, and nonprofit or for-profit organizations concerned with mathematics and science education.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:        No Child Left Behind, Title II, Part B

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:            

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                          

Federal-                       100%

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $7.9m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: For 2012-13: 2,810 participants in the statewide program included teachers, administrators, and non-teaching coaches; participants were affiliated with 1,161 public schools and 40 non-public schools. Almost all the public school participants came from high-need schools.

Title III Language Instruction for English Language Learners Students

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With the reauthorization of the Bilingual Education Act as Title III of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, federal bilingual funding has been converted from a direct competitive grant program to a State formula program.  Funds are provided to states on a formula based on 80 percent on the number of English Language Learners ) (ELLs) in the State and 20 percent on the number of immigrant children and youth in the State.  NCLB Title III funds supplement local and State funds for bilingual education, and are intended to ensure that children and youth who are ELLs develop high levels of academic achievement and proficiency in the English language.  Similarly, the program is designed to help these students meet the same challenging State academic standards as all children are expected to meet.  

At the programmatic level, Title III funds are intended to supplement local and State funding of high-quality professional development for their instructional programs and teachers, so that they are better prepared to identify and address the needs of ELLs.  This includes upgrading the qualifications and skills of non-certified educational personnel to enable them to meet high professional standards for education of these students.  Professional development programs, as well as direct instructional programs for ELL students, must be based on scientifically based research that has proven to be effective in helping these students achieve at higher levels.

Funds are provided to local educational agencies (LEAs) to provide high-quality language instruction, educational programs, and high-quality professional development by carrying out one or more of the following activities:

  • Language instruction programs and academic content instruction programs.
  • Locally designed activities to expand or enhance existing language instruction
  • educational   programs and academic content instruction programs.
  • Implementing, within an individual school, school-wide programs for restructuring,
  • reforming, and upgrading academic content instruction.
  • Implementing, within the entire LEAs, district wide programs for restructuring, reforming,
  • and upgrading all relevant programs, activities and operations relating to language instruction, educational programs and academic content instruction.

NCLB Title III assessment and accountability requirements hold schools and districts accountable for achieving annual measurable objectives (AMAO's) for ELL students in attaining English proficiency. LEAs are required to provide informed parental notification (in the language that the parents understand) as to why their child is in need of placement in a specialized instruction program, and encourage parents to be active participants in their child's education.

LEAs are required to certify that all teachers in a language instruction program for LEP students are fluent in English and in any other language used by the program, including written and oral communication skills.

LEAs are required to develop a local plan that addresses the requirements of Title III and use funds to provide supplementary educational services to ELL students consistent with CR Part 154 of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education.

LEAs experiencing unexpectedly large increases in the number of immigrant students are eligible for Title III Immigrant funds.  In addition to assisting immigrant students to learn English and attain high academic achievement, funds under this section of Title III are intended to help these students successfully transition into American society.  These funds may also be used to underwrite activities to help the parents of immigrant students become active participants in the education of their children.  Additionally, these funds may also be used to support the provision of training to educational personnel targeted to meet the special needs of immigrant children and youth.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:        NCLB 2001, Title III, §3001

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:            

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                          

Federal-                       100%

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $59.1M

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: n/a

Title IV, Part B - 21st Century Community Learning Centers

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The 21st Century Community Learning Centers Program is authorized under Title IV, Part B, of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as amended by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.  The purpose of this competitive grant Program is to create community learning centers that provide academic enrichment opportunities to students who attend high-poverty and low-performing schools so that they can meet State and local standards in core academic areas.  In addition, these centers will offer a broad array of enrichment activities that can complement the regular academic program, and promote social and emotional development, as well as provide literacy and other educational services to families of students who participate in this Program.  Services must be offered during non-school hours or periods when school is not in session, including before school, after school, evenings, weekends and during the summer, and during regular school hours. SED oversees the administration of 185 programs hiring 507 sites that serve 55,000 students.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:        No Child Left Behind Act PL 107-110, Title IV, Part B

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:            

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                          

Federal-                       100%

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $83.1m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: n/a

Title VI, Part B, Subpart 2 - Rural and Low-Income School Program

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The purpose is to improve student achievement.  Funds may be used to support a variety of activities, including:

  • Teacher recruitment and retention.
  • Teacher professional development.
  • Educational technology.
  • Parental involvement activities.
  • Title I School Improvement.
  • Other activities authorized under Title I-Part A,  Title III- Part A; Title IV-Part A.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:        No Child Left Behind PL 107-110

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:            

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                          

Federal-                       100%

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $1.9m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: formula allocations for rural LEA's meeting specified geographic, demographic, and fiscal criteria

Title X, Part C - Homeless Education

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The purpose of the McKinney-Vento Education of Homeless Children and Youth Act is to ensure that all homeless children have equal access to the same free appropriate public education, including public preschool education, provided to children and youth who are permanently housed. The Education of Homeless Children and Youth program provides funds to school districts to develop and implement strategies and model programs which “facilitate the enrollment, attendance and success in school of homeless children and youth.” Funds may be used for educational services (including tutoring); expedited evaluations; awareness training; health services; excess cost of transportation; early childhood programs; record keeping; parent programs; coordinating services; violence prevention; providing supplies, services and learning environments at shelters and other temporary housing facilities.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:        No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, Title X, Part C

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Education Law §§1502 and 3602

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                          

Federal-                       100%

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $3.9m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: SY 2013-14; 41,670 (Number of students served by 34 programs that include174 LEAs funded by the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act)