Office of Cultural Education

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Educational Television and Public Broadcasting

New York State Library – Grants-In-Aid to Libraries and Library Systems

State Archives - Archival Services

State Archives - Government Records Services

State Library – Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) Program

Workforce Investment Act (WIA) - Title II

Educational Television and Public Broadcasting

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The Office of Educational Television and Public Broadcasting is charged with the responsibility of maintaining a financially sound public telecommunications system in the State through the administration of local assistance funds for the operational, programmatic and instructional needs of the 9 State public television stations and 17 public radio stations. This responsibility of the Office provides an opportunity to help the Education Department form cost-effective, dynamic partnerships between itself and public broadcasting and between public broadcasting and the educational community. To this end, the Office is committed to a long-term, broad-based effort to meet educational needs that can best be addressed through public broadcasting and telecommunications technologies.

Beyond maintaining a sound public broadcasting system, the Office of Educational Television and Public Broadcasting is responsible for facilitating and advising the stations’ acquisition and production of high-quality programming materials for the State’s learners. Furthermore, the Office is charged with fostering a climate conducive to the invigorated use of digital multimedia technologies to benefit virtually all citizens in every area of the State. To fulfill its mission, the Office has affirmed the following goals:

■ Public Broadcasting will be a major factor in providing education to all New Yorkers. The Office ensures the effective development of instructional television and radio services provided to students and other citizens through broadcast, broadband, community outreach and interactive telecommunications.

■ The Public Broadcasting System in New York State will be financially sound. The Office provides leadership and direction to the State’s public broadcasting stations, administering State aid for operational, programmatic and instructional support.

■ The Office will provide coordination for video programming and other telecommunications-related services to support the Board of Regents and the Education Department’s priorities in cooperation with program offices in the Department, the public broadcasting stations, and other education and cultural institutions of the State.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Education Law Section 236

State Regulation:      8NYCRR Part 179

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $14.5M

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: n/a

New York State Library – Grants-In-Aid to Libraries and Library Systems

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The State Library administers some $122.4 million in statutory State local assistance grants-in-aid, capital grants and state operations funds that benefit New York State’s library systems and 7000 libraries.  For 2016-2017, the Legislature appropriated $115,670,000 million in support of these programs. Each of these programs has specific purposes and requirements as described in Education Law and Commissioner’s regulations. The funding amounts listed are in statute.

  • Aid for Public Library Systems and Public Libraries

General formula aid for public Libraries and public Library Systems is appropriated for the 23 public library systems, their central libraries, and all of their 755 member public libraries and some 330 neighborhood branches. Formula factors authorized in Education Law §272 and §273 on which library aid is appropriated, take into account the population, geographic area of service, local support, expenditures for library materials, and other characteristics and needs of the regions served. Also included in General Library Aid are the Central Library Aid Programs, the Coordinated Outreach Services Program, and the Local Services Aid programs (Local Library Services Aid, Local Services Support Aid and Local Consolidates Services Aid).

  • Adult Literacy Services Grants for Public Libraries and Systems   

Education Law §273 provides $200,000 in grant funds to public libraries and library systems for establishing or increasing services to illiterate adults. To be eligible, libraries must cooperate directly with schools, colleges, or other community agencies or organizations operating similar adult literacy programs.

  • Family Literary Services Grants for Public Libraries and Systems

Education Law §273 authorizes $300,000 in grant funds to public libraries and library systems to enrich family literary programs conducted by a public library or public library system.

  • Inter-Institutional Library Services – Public Library System Services to County Jails

Education Law §285 provides $175,000 in formula aid to 23 public library systems to improve library services to inmates of correctional institutions maintained by counties throughout the State and the City of New York. 

  • Indian Libraries

Education Law §271 provides formula aid for public libraries on the St. Regis Mohawk, Tonawanda Senecas, and the Seneca Nation of Indian reservations based on reservation population and other factors. The official populations are certified annually by the New York State Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance.

  • The New York Public Library

Education Law §273 provides formula aid to The New York Public Library ($6.4 million) for books and other research resources, and to support four special programs: The New York Public Library’s Andrew Heiskell Braille and Talking Book Library ($984,000) to provide service to blind and physically disabled persons in seven downstate counties including New York City and Long Island; the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture ($734,000), the nation’s largest, most comprehensive and heavily used repository of records documenting the history and culture of people of African descent; The New York Public Library Program of services to the students of the City University of New York ($2 million); and The New York Public Library Science, Industry and Business Library ($1 million).

  • Public Library System Services to State Correctional Facility Libraries

Education Law §285 provides a formula allocation of $9.25 per inmate to public library systems to develop and extend library services to State correctional facilities within their service area.

  • Public Library Systems and Statewide Summer Reading Program

Education Law §273 provides an unspecified amount of funding from the “Love Your Library” fund established in §99.1 of the State Finance Law to support formula aid to public library systems for participation in the statewide Summer Reading program. The Legislature has not appropriated funding for this program since its inception.

  • State Aid for Library Construction

Education Law §273-a provides State Aid for Library Construction for a statutory formula program that provides funds for the construction, rehabilitation or renovation of public library and public library system buildings, including broadband installation and infrastructure projects. State funds are allocated by formula to each of the 23 public library system. Local libraries submit applications for funding through their local library system to the State Library. Applications are reviewed for eligibility and completeness by the State Library and the Dormitory Authority of the State of New York. In 2016-2017 the State provided $19 million in capital funds for public library construction grants under Education Law §273-a.

 

Aid for Reference and Research Library Resources Systems

  • General Formula Aid for Reference and Research Library Resources Systems

Education Law §273 provides formula aid to promote and facilitate resource-sharing activities among academic and special libraries and other types of systems. These nine regional systems coordinate the hospital library services program, the medical information services program, the coordinated collection development program for academic libraries, and the regional databases program for libraries in their service area. State Aid supports digitization, interlibrary loan, delivery, professional development, automation and other coordinated activities that promote resource sharing and access to information.

  • Coordinated Collection Development Aid for Academic Libraries

Education Law §273 provides formula aid to libraries of public and nonprofit independent colleges and universities for coordinated collection development. Libraries must meet certain criteria, including membership in a reference and research library resources system and full participation in interlibrary loan and other resource sharing programs. The nine Reference and Research Library Resources Systems, working with the academic libraries in their regions, have formulated collection development plans for their regions.

  • Hospital Library Services Program

Education Law §273 provides formula aid to the nine Reference and Research Library Resources Systems for strengthening hospital library services.

  • Medical Information Services Program

Education Law §273 provides formula aid to the nine Reference and Research Library Resources Systems for supporting delivery of consumer health and medical information services to users of academic, public, school and special libraries.

  • Regional Bibliographic Databases and Interlibrary Resources Sharing

Education Law §273 provides formula aid for the efficient and coordinated development of computer technologies to support bibliographic control and interlibrary sharing of information within and among the service areas of each of the nine Reference and Research Library Resources Systems and its member academic and special libraries and public and school library systems.

 

Aid for School Library Systems

Formula aid is provided under Education Law, §§282-284 to 41 school library systems based in the BOCES and the Big Five Cities to facilitate sharing of library resources for more than 4,400 public and nonpublic school libraries. State Aid supports interlibrary loan, delivery, continuing education, coordination of collection development, automation and database building activities, and service to clients with special needs for some three million students K-12 statewide.

Special Programs

  • Center for Jewish History, Inc.

Education Law §273 provides $200,000 in formula aid to the Center for Jewish History, Inc., to increase public access to the library collections and services of the member institutions.

  • Conservation and Preservation of Library Research Materials

Education Law §273 provides funding for libraries and other organizations engaged in efforts to preserve deteriorating library research materials. There are two parts: formula funds ($158,000) for each of the 11 comprehensive research libraries in New York State; and competitive grant funds ($500,000) for some 7,000 other institutions such as public libraries, museums, and historical societies possessing unique and rare research materials that warrant preservation for public access to and use by future generations of New Yorkers.

  • New-York Historical Society

Education Law §273 provides $250,000 in formula aid to the New-York Historical Society, a major resource library with collections relevant to the study of United States, New York State and New York City. The funds are used to increase public access to library collections and services.

  • New York State Library -The Talking Book and Braille Library

Education Law §273 provides formula aid of $19 per reader to the New York State Library Talking Book and Braille Library (TBBL) for its statewide program that serves eligible visually impaired, physically disabled, and learning disabled readers in 55 upstate counties. There are more than 31,750 New Yorkers who receive TBBL services.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Education Law Title I, Sections 271-273, 273-a, 282-285

State Regulation:      8NYCRR Part 90

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                           100%

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $115,670,000, appropriated for 2016-2017 (includes $19M in capital funds for Library Construction)

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED:    19.38 million

State Archives - Archival Services

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The New York State Archives through its Archival Services Program ensures the identification, management and accessibility of historical records statewide and the archival records of New York State and colonial governments. The Archives coordinates statewide documentation, archival advisory services and access to historical records across the state through its Documentary Heritage Program (DHP). As a result of these services, historical record repositories are better able to manage and make available an inclusive comprehensive documentation of the history and cultures of New York. The Archives also identifies, accessions, preserves, and makes available those records of New York State government that have long-term value for documenting public programs and policy decisions, maintaining government accountability, providing legal evidence, and meeting research and other special needs of the government and the public. The Archives provides administrative support for the State Historical Records Advisory Board (SHRAB) in its role in planning statewide archival strategy.

 

Statewide Archival Services - The DHP of the State Archives, enacted in 1988 to strengthen New York’s historical records programs, improves the collection, care and management of historical records programs statewide and increases their availability and use by researchers. The DHP awards competitive grants to historical records programs and provides advisory services to programs statewide.  In the years of its existence, the DHP has provided direct advisory and program development services to hundreds of historical records repositories; facilitated the identification and preservation of historically valuable records of over 2,500 under documented organizations and groups; supported many workshops on techniques for managing historical records; fostered greater use of historical records; and encouraged the development of new programs and closer cooperation among existing programs. Through direct grants to historical records programs, the DHP has supported projects to improve the documentation of New York, the arrangement and description of historical records to make them more readily available for research, and other projects to improve their care and management.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Arts and Cultural Affairs Law Section 57.05; Education Law, Section 140

State Regulation:      8NYCRR Part 189.1

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                          

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-        $461,000

Total-                           $461,000

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: n/a

State Library – Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) Program

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The State Library administers the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) Grants to the States program.  LSTA was enacted on September 30, 1996, as part of the federal Museum and Library Services Act.  The overall purposes and priorities of the LSTA program are established in federal law. Each State Library Agency may determine which purposes and priorities its program will address.

The overall purposes of the Library Services and Technology Act are to:

  • enhance coordination among federal programs that relate to library and information services;
  • promote continuous improvement in library services in all types of libraries in order to better serve the people of the United States;
  • facilitate access to resources in all types of libraries for the purpose of cultivating an educated and informed citizenry;
  • encourage resource sharing among all types of libraries for the purpose of achieving economical and efficient delivery of library services to the public;
  • promote literacy, education, and lifelong learning and to enhance and expand the services and resources provided by libraries, including those services and resources relating to workforce development, 21st century skills, and digital literacy skills;
  • enhance the skills of the current library workforce and to recruit future professionals to the field of library and information services;
  • ensure the preservation of knowledge and library collections in all formats and to enable libraries to serve their communities during disasters;
  • enhance the role of libraries within the information infrastructure of the United States in order to support research, education, and innovation; and
  • promote library services that provide users with access to information through national, state, local, regional, and international collaborations and networks.

 

The Act specifies the following priorities for the Grants to States program:

  • expand services for learning and access to information and educational resources in a variety of formats, in all types of libraries, for individuals of all ages in order to support such individuals' needs for education, lifelong learning, workforce development, and digital literacy skills;
  • establish or enhance electronic and other linkages and improved coordination among and between libraries and entities for the purpose of improving the quality of and access to library and information services;
  • provide training and professional development, including continuing education, to enhance the skills of the current library workforce and leadership, and advance the delivery of library and information services;
  • enhance efforts to recruit future professionals to the field of library and information services;
  • develop public and private partnerships with other agencies and community-based organizations;
  • target library services to individuals of diverse geographic, cultural, and socioeconomic backgrounds, and to individuals with limited functional literacy or information skills;
  • target library and information services to persons having difficulty using a library and to underserved urban and rural communities, including children (from birth through age 17) from families with incomes below the poverty line (as defined by the Office of Management and Budget and revised annually in accordance with section 9902(2) of title 42) applicable to a family of the size involved;
  • develop library services that provide all users access to information through local, state, regional, national, and international collaborations and networks; and
  • carry out other activities consistent with the purposes set forth in section 9121, as described in the SLAA's plan.

 

IMLS requires a Five-Year Plan (http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/lsta/plan1217.htm) that describes the Department's mission and the library and information service needs identified for the state, and the ways in which the Department plans to use federal LSTA funds to meet those needs. For the five-year period October 1, 2012 through September 30, 2017, the Department’s plan for LSTA consists of four major goals:

1.All New Yorkers will have improved access to library resources that advance and enhance their personal, educational and working lives.

2.The Office of Cultural Education, library systems and libraries will deliver new and improved programs that anticipate and meet New Yorkers' evolving needs for library services.

3.New Yorkers of all ages will perceive libraries as community learning spaces offering high-quality lifelong learning, literacy, and knowledge creation opportunities that enhance civic engagement and economic vitality.

4.All New Yorkers will benefit from statewide programs and services of the Office of Cultural Education that effectively leverage private and public funding through collaboration and partnerships and maximize value in order to achieve goals one, two and three.

The Office of Cultural Education will carry out the goals of this plan through statewide services and, as funding allows, a grants program. The grant categories and eligibility will be defined in annual grant program guidelines.  The State of New York is required to match federal LSTA funds with other funds to carry out the goals and activities described in the Five-Year Plan.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:        Library Services and Technology Act (20 USC 9121 et seq.)

Federal Regulation:  45 CFR 1180

State Statute:            

State Regulation:     

 

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                          

Federal-                       100%

Special Revenue-       

Total-                           $8,082,104

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: n/a

State Archives - Government Records Services

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The State Archives administers the central records management program and provides advisory services for State government agencies and a broad range of technical assistance, advice, and grants support to approximately 4,500 local governments on a spectrum of records management issues. These services are provided from the State Archives’ Albany office and from a network of nine regionally located offices.

State law authorizes the State Archives to develop and disseminate records retention and disposition schedules for New York’s State and local governments, oversee the use of disposition schedules by State Executive Branch agencies and provide training, technical assistance, technology advisory services and other consultant services to support records management. Examples of government records services, which the State Archives provides, include advice and assistance in:

  • Records management program planning and evaluation.
  • Files and record keeping system design and management.
  • Records retention and disposition.
  • Electronic records management and applied information technology.
  • Identifying and meeting record keeping requirements.
  • Business process analysis and managing records in automated office environments.
  • Security for and access to records.
  • Disaster preparedness and recovery.
  • Storage and preservation.
  • Records appraisal imaging and micrographics.

The State Archives administers a local assistance program, funded by the Local Government Records Management Improvement Fund. Through a competitive grant program, local governments may apply for funds to initiate or enhance local records management programs. For the 2015-2016 year, the State Archives awarded nearly $1 million to municipal agencies of the City of New York and more than $3 million in additional grants to 200 local governments across the State. Local governments use their grant funds for a variety of records management projects, some of which include developing electronic information systems, conducting thorough inventories of records, developing plans for managing records, and conducting projects to microfilm and preserve local government archival records. Since the program was created in 1989, 9,893 grants totaling $208,089,225 in assistance have been awarded to local governments to support records management improvement projects.

 

AUTHORITY:

Federal Statute:       

Federal Regulation: 

State Statute:             Arts and Cultural Affairs Law Section 57.05 (a) and (b)

State Regulation:      8NYCRR Parts 185 and 188

FUNDING SOURCE(S):

State-                          

Federal-                      

Special Revenue-        $5m

Total-                           $5m

 

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED: n/a